Archives

Call for AHA Heart Ball Award nominations

Posted on July 22, 2016

The American Heart Association is currently accepting nominations for the 2016 Washtenaw County Heart Ball Awards. The three awards are outlined below:

  • The Coeur D’Or (Heart of Gold) Award for Excellence: This award is given to an individual, who through his or her professional accomplishments, has made great strides in the advancement of the American Heart Association.

  • The Cor Vitae (Heart of Life) Award for Community Service Award: This recognition is given to an individual who, through tireless dedication to their community, demonstrates love and caring for his or her fellow man; who, through his or her giving and support, enhances the quality of life for many; and who, through his or her generosity, has played a significant role in advancing the mission of the AHA.

  • The Young Investigator Award for Excellence: This honor is given to an individual, who through his or her early career accomplishment has made great strides in the advancement of the AHA.

These awards are not just reserved for physicians – nursing and support staff are eligible as well. Additional information, along with a nomination form, can be found on the event's website. All nominations should to be submitted directly to Katie Scott, American Heart Association Heart Ball Director, via email at Katie.Scott@heart.org no later than Friday, Aug. 5.  If you have any questions about the awards or nomination process, please contact Katie via email or at 248-767-6846.

Website: https://ahasouthfield.ejoinme.org/MyEvents/20162017WashtenawCountyHeartBall/tabid/770360/Default.aspx

Workshop: Speaking Up is Hard to Do

Posted on July 22, 2016

Have you ever wondered “Why didn’t I say something?” after witnessing social bias — a stereotype, a prejudice or discrimination — that happened in your everyday life? You’re not alone. Research suggests that people typically want to respond when bias occurs, but more often than not they do not do so.

Deciding whether and how to respond to bias is complicated, but understanding what motivates us to speak up, the challenges we face when doing so, and strategies for effective responding can help bystanders better evaluate their options. Participants in this workshop will learn about bystander reactions to social biases and how these reactions can help or hinder decisions to speak up.

Workshop activities will include small-group discussion of reactions to everyday incidents of bias in academic settings as well as strategies for speaking up effectively. Participants will leave with concrete strategies for considering how to address biases across classroom, social and academic workplace settings.

Facilitator: Stephanie A. Goodwin, Ph.D., Director for Faculty Development & Leadership at Wright State University

When: Monday, Sept. 26

Time: 8:30 a.m. – 10 a.m.

Where: BSRB Seminar Rooms (1st floor)

Breakfast will be provided.

Register online

This workshop is hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. Please note that this workshop is for faculty only. Questions? Please contact Jordan Wright, wjordan@umich.edu.

Website: http://faculty.medicine.umich.edu/workshops/they-say-speaking-hard-do-bystander-intervention-responding-everyday-incidents-bias

Workshop: Sleep Optimization for Busy Medical Faculty

Posted on July 22, 2016

This session will present and discuss the role of sleep and fatigue in cognitive and physical performance. The facilitators will delineate the sleep and circadian 'thieves' that impair our daily functioning and discuss easily-implemented behaviors to enhance sleep, energy and performance.

Facilitators: 
Jonathan Barkham, MD, Clinical Instructor of Internal Medicine and Neurology
Cathy Goldstein, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurology

Objectives:

  • To understand the impact that fatigue and sleepiness have on performance and burn-out
  • To describe the purpose of sleep and circadian control of sleep timing and other biological rhythms
  • To discuss adequate sleep durations and determine your individual sleep need to optimize your energy levels
  • To outline the repercussions of circadian disruption and how to ensure alignment of your internal clock with your required schedule
  • To provide sleep 'hacks' to improve the quality and quantity of your sleep for optimal alertness

Breakfast will be provided.

When: Friday, Nov. 11

Time: 8 a.m. – 10 a.m.

Where: BSRB Seminar Rooms (1st floor)

Register online

This workshop is hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. Please note that this workshop is for faculty only. Questions? Please contact Jordan Wright, wjordan@umich.edu.

Website: http://faculty.medicine.umich.edu/workshops/smarter-faster-stronger-longer-sleep-optimization-busy-medical-faculty

Plan ahead and expect delays: Fuller Rd. sidewalk project

Posted on July 22, 2016

Please be advised that a sidewalk project to install ADA-accessible ramps at three Fuller Rd. intersections will begin Monday, July 25.

The work will take place at the intersections of Fuller Rd. and Cedar Bend, Fuller Rd. and Fuller Ct., and Fuller Rd. and Glazier Way. Expect some delays and single-lane closures during this project.

Here is what you need to know to help our patients and each other:

  • One of the two eastbound lanes along Fuller Road is expected to be closed from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, July 25-27.
  • One of the two westbound lanes is expected to be closed from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday, July 28-29, and Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 1-3.
  • The bus bays and parking lots will be open throughout the entirety of the project

Thank you for your patience!

One surgeon’s tour of duty

Posted on July 22, 2016

veteran
Dr. Dawn Coleman is welcomed back to UMHS after a 90-day tour in Iraq.

Dr. Dawn Coleman is welcomed back to UMHS after a 90-day tour in Iraq.

Dawn Coleman, M.D., feels blessed to be given the opportunity to serve her country.

Dr. Coleman, a vascular surgeon at the U-M Frankel Cardiovascular Center, recently returned from a 90-day tour in Iraq as part of the U.S. Army Reserve.

“My role in giving back to my country is very small in comparison to what I’ve gained and what others have given,” says Coleman, who joined the military in 2003, prompted by a sense of duty and a strong family history of service.

She was assigned to a forward operating base with her home unit, the 948th Forward Surgical Team. The team’s mission was to provide medical assistance to local, national, coalition and U.S. troops.

Coleman said the work she and her colleagues perform at U-M put her in the best position to help the wounded.

“My training at U-M prepared me for the complex injuries we have to manage on the battlefield,” Dr. Coleman said. “Each day brought different challenges.”

As part of a forward surgical unit, Coleman was based near the combat zone and was immediately available to triage and resuscitate casualties. The team was equipped to perform damage-control surgery to salvage life, limbs and eyesight and to stabilize patients for transport to a higher level of hospital care.

“Our unit did a tremendous amount of good,” she said proudly of her first deployment.

To read more about Coleman’s incredbile story, go to the Michigan Health blog.

Website: http://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/lifestyle/a-surgeon-answers-her-countrys-call

Howell Vanpool has Immediate Opening

Posted on July 22, 2016

Howell Meijer
6:30am

UMHS Hospital and Domino Farms
7:30am

UMHS Hospital and Domino Farms
4:30pm

Howell Meijer
5:20pm

HopeL@med.umich.edu

Eastside of Jackson 7:45-4:30

Posted on July 22, 2016

Eastside Meijer
07:55am

Cancer Center Parking Structure
7:40am

Cancer Center Parking Structure
4:30pm

Eastside Meijer
5:20pm

Chelle Robins (crobins@umich.edu or 6-1671)

U-M joins low-risk TAVR study

Posted on July 21, 2016

BeFunky_TAVR_team_VC_045.jpg

BeFunky_TAVR_team_VC_045.jpg

Procedures that rely on tiny tubes guided to the heart have transformed the way doctors treat severely ill patients who are too frail for surgery.

Now this surgery alternative is being investigated in a broader patient population, allowing 1,200 patients from across the country who are at low surgical risk to be considered for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

The U-M Frankel Cardiovascular Center enrolled its first patients in the low-risk TAVR study on July 6. Study participants have a 50/50 chance of receiving TAVR if they are a low-risk patient.

“The trial is designed to assess the safety and performance of a new approach to aortic valve replacement,” says G. Michael Deeb, M.D., the Herbert Sloan Collegiate Professor of Surgery and principal investigator for the trial at U-M.

The study is an expanded trial for the CoreValve Evolut R System, a next-generation device that’s designed to provide physicians the option to recapture the valve and reposition it during the procedure.

Once in place, the device expands and takes over the diseased valve’s function to enable oxygen-rich blood to flow efficiently out of the heart.

Cardiac teams at U-M have performed more than 700 TAVR procedures, making the heart center tops in the nation for investigational and real-world TAVR experience.

For questions about this study, contact Katie Wopinsky at 888-286-4420, or email cvcvolunteer@med.umich.edu.

Website: https://umclinicalstudies.org/hum00113034

Preventing, spotting and responding to identity theft

Posted on July 21, 2016

identity_theft

identity_theft

If you suspect a patient is involved in identity theft or medical identity theft, please notify your supervisor immediately.

If suspicion about the patient is warranted, immediately contact Hospital Security. Complete a patient safety report and provide all pertinent information, including the patient’s name and registration number involved in the suspicious activity.

What are Identity Theft (ID Theft) and Medical Identity Theft?

ID Theft occurs when a person’s identity or identifying information has been assumed or used by someone else to profit illegally or commit an unlawful act (e.g., using someone’s personal information to fraudulently apply for a credit card, or selling someone’s personal information).

Medical ID Theft is healthcare fraud. This occurs when a person has attempted to or actually uses another person’s identifying information to obtain medical care (e.g., using a relative or friend’s identification to obtain medical care so the care would be paid for by the friend’s/relative’s medical insurance).

What are Indicators of Potential Identity Theft?

Identity Theft is not always easy to recognize. Here are some examples of suspicious activity that may indicate possible identity theft:

Presentation or Receipt of Suspicious Documents 

  1. Patient refuses to provide name or other information required at registration for identification.
  2. Patient presents identification or other identifying information suspected as false.
  3. Patient complains that they received a bill, an explanation of benefits (EOB), or some other document related to medical service that they say they never received.
  4. Patient reports discrepancies in medical record information – the discrepancies  do not reflect the patient’s history or medical care received (e.g., patient record indicates that patient had a broken arm, but presenting patient had no actual history of broken bones).

 

Suspicious Insurance or Credit Activity

  1. Patient complains that insurance coverage for a hospital stay has been denied – the patient’s insurance company said that insurance benefits have been depleted or a lifetime cap has been reached – the patient tells you he never received medical care/services to that extent.
  2. Complaint/inquiry from a patient about information added to a credit report by a health care provider or insurer.
  3. Dispute of a bill by a patient who claims to be the victim of any type of identity theft.
  4. A notice or inquiry from an insurance fraud investigator for a private insurance company or a law enforcement agency.

 

Additional Information:

Identity Theft Program

Contact the UMHS Compliance Office at Compliance-group@med.umich.edu or 615-4400.

Website: https://umhsheadlines.org/2015/07/preventing-spotting-and-responding-to-id-theft-3/