Results from 24-hospital stroke study led by U-M show promise

From the moment a stroke occurs, patients must race against the clock to get treatment that can prevent lasting damage.

Now, a new U-M-led study shows the promise – and the challenges – of getting them state-of-the-art treatment safely at their local hospital, saving precious minutes.

The results come from an effort that tested methods to improve delivery of a time-sensitive, clot-busting drug in stroke patients at 24 community hospitals across Michigan. To date, clot-busting treatment has been mostly used at larger hospitals.

The research effort was coordinated by members of the Department of Emergency Medicine, Department of Neurology and Stroke Program, which offered half the hospitals education and round-the-clock treatment assistance by phone. The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health.

By the end of the study, the community hospitals across Michigan that had the U-M experts as the “sixth man” on their teams did better at delivering the drug called tPA to eligible patients than those that didn’t.

The findings of the randomized controlled trial are published in The Lancet Neurology. They show that community hospitals can indeed improve patients’ chances of getting tPA in the first few hours of a stroke, without increased risk of dangerous bleeding.

Read more, and get access to the study:

http://www.uofmhealth.org/news/archive/201212/tpatrial

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